University of New Hampshire

School of Law

Housing Guide

Finding a new place to live can be challenging. Here are a few basic guidelines to help you better understand the easiest way to go about finding a suitable apartment in Concord.

Expectations

Many buildings in Concord were built in the early 1900s. Although some recently constructed housing complexes do exist, Concord is a historic New England town with many aging buildings. Virtually all of the apartments close to the University of New Hampshire School of Law and the downtown area tend to be older, renovated Victorian homes which offer a variety or unique and comfortable apartments that have characteristics you would not find in a complex of apartments. If you travel 5 to 10 minutes away from UNH School of Law you will find apartment complexes, condominium complexes or duplexes for rent. Most of the complexes offer modern luxuries such as wall-to-wall carpeting, central air conditioning and fitness centers or pools.

Note: Due to the presence of lead paint, New Hampshire law prohibits landlords from renting many houses constructed before 1976 to families with young children. If you have infants or young children, be certain to check for the presence of lead paint prior to signing a rental agreement.

Be Prepared to Act Fast

At times, the availability of housing in Concord can be limited. If you see a place that is close to your price-range and meets your basic needs, take it.

A Lease Agreement

Signing a lease is the customary way to rent an apartment. Before moving in to your new place, you will have to sign a lease–a contract that states your obligation to pay rent on the property for a specific duration of time.

A Security Deposit

A security deposit (generally the amount of one month's rent) is required prior to moving in to an apartment. This sum protects the landlord from unspecified damages to the property. If no major damages occur, the deposit is returned at the end of the lease.

Utilities

Before signing a lease, the landlord may or may not agree to pay for specific utilities (heat, electricity, etc.). Information concerning the average price of each utility can be received from the landlord. Because of the cold New Hampshire winter, heat is generally the most expensive of the utilities.

Landlord Rules/Policies

Landlords have specific rules and/or policies that should be respected. They may have rules/policies regarding loud music, certain types of cooking, and pets. Inquire about these rules/policies prior to signing the lease. Once you have agreed to the terms, abide by them throughout your stay.

Furnishings

Many apartments are not furnished, but students can easily find basic furnishings. Used furniture can be bought at a fair price and is found in the classified section of the local newspaper, from other students or local residents, from used furniture stores in town, and on the internet.

Roommates

Renting an apartment for one can be expensive. The willingness to share space with other students is not only a more economical way to live, but can also provide an interesting learning environment for people from diverse cultures and backgrounds.

The ability to adapt to a new environment and new people is vital to a fruitful experience at UNH School of Law. We wish you the best of luck.

Contact Us

Christine Rousseau
Housing Coordinator
housing@law.unh.edu

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