University of New Hampshire

School of Law

UNH Law’s International Technology Transfer Institute At Work In Africa, Asia, South America

UNH Law's International Technology Transfer Institute is expanding its global impact.

ITTI Director Dr. Stanley Kowalski has made two recent trips, at the request of the World Intellectual Property Organization, to developing countries to help them lay the foundation for knowledge-based economies.

"WIPO has been pleased to work with ITTI, and appreciates the important work that ITTI continues to pursue; building capacity in IP management, technology transfer and information access to advance innovation in developing countries across the globe," said WIPO Director General Francis Gurry.

Dr. Kowalski with students at the Prince Edward School, a public school for boys in Harare,
Zimbabwe (standing beside Dr. Kowalski is Aleck Ncube, former UNH-Law Fulbright Scholar).

Earlier this summer, Dr. Kowalski spent a week in Zimbabwe, where he taught as part of a week-long educational program, jointly sponsored by WIPO and the African Regional Intellectual Property Organization, focused on innovation support through access to technical knowledge and establishing technology and innovation support centers.

Participants included government officials and patent experts from more than 30 Sub-Saharan African countries. While in Zimbabwe, Dr. Kowalski also met with US Embassy officials, Zimbabwean government officials and various Zimbabwean stakeholders from the public and private sectors to discuss collaboration between UNH Law and Zimbabwean institutions to build capacity in intellectual property management and technology transfer. Dr. Kowalski also met with representatives from the United States Agency for International Development to discuss possible collaborations between UNH Law and this government agency, which provides US economic and humanitarian assistance worldwide.

Dr. Kowalski also met with students at the Prince Edward School, a public school for boys in Harare. His two-hour presentation to about 80 students focused on the cycle of invention, intellectual property protection and innovations that help society. His talk at the school was arranged and facilitated by the US Embassy in Zimbabwe.

"I am greatly encouraged after this trip," he said. "Zimbabwe has enormous potential to become an innovation leader in the South African region over the next several decades."

He plans to return to Zimbabwe next summer to work with Fulbrighter and former UNH Law distinguished visiting scholar and ITTI fellow Aleck Ncube and the National University of Science and Technology to host expanded discussions on advancing science, technology and innovation in Zimbabwe.

Dr. Kowalski also spent a week this summer in the Philippines, where he taught in a seminar, organized by WIPO and the Intellectual Property Office of the Philippines (IPOPHIL), on intellectual property and patent information search strategies. Workshops were held at the Cebu Institute of Technology and the University of Santo Tomas in Manila, and participants included IP and technology transfer professionals from universities and research institutions in the Philippines.

He also met with IPP's deputy director general, Andrew Ong, a 2008 graduate of UNH Law's International Property Summer Institute, to discuss how UNH Law might work with the office to build IP management and technology transfer capabilities in the Philippines. Dr. Kowalski plans to return to the Philippines next year to continue that work.

"It's incredibly rewarding to utilize the knowledge and resources we have here at UNH Law to help developing countries build platforms to accelerate delivery of innovations in health and agriculture," Dr. Kowalski said. "The fact that we are able to work synergistically with global organizations such as WIPO allows us to effect more rapid progress to build innovation ecosystems for sustainable global development."

This month, Dr. Kowalski will return to Colombia to continue ongoing ITTI project development in that country. He was invited by Colombia's Administrative Department of Science, Technology and Innovation.

In mid-October, Dr. Kowalski will return to Argentina to further an existing project with the country's National Scientific and Technical Research Council, CONICET. As with the projects in Zimbabwe and the Philippines, ITTI will work with local stakeholders in Argentina to build IP management and technology transfer capacity.

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