University of New Hampshire

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Expanding UNH Law’s Global Network: International Technology Transfer Institute in the Philippines

Expanding UNH Law’s Global Network: International Technology Transfer Institute in the Philippines

Professor Selected to Train Scientists, Educators in IP Management

 

The University of New Hampshire School of Law’s International Technology Transfer Institute is a key part of United Nations- and U.S. government-funded initiatives to build intellectual property and technology transfer capacity in the Philippines.

The U.S. government-funded project, supported by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) via a grant to the International Intellectual Property Institute (IIPI), aims to boost the Philippine economy by helping the country turn its science and technology research into patented, commercializable inventions via more effective IP and technology transfer mechanisms and capabilities. This project builds on a foundation laid by the World Intellectual Property Organization (WIPO) through its Technology and Innovation Support Center (TISC) program in the Philippines. This has led to the establishment of a network of Innovation and Technology Support Offices (ITSOs), strengthening local institutional capacity for access to patent information and use of the patent system to advance innovation in the Philippines.

Dr. Stanley Kowalski, who heads UNH Law's globally renowned International Technology Transfer Institute (ITTI), joined a team of three other experts: Dr. Richard Cahoon, retired director of the Cornell University Research Foundation (technology transfer office), currently on the International Professional Development Committee of the Association of University Technology Managers (AUTM); Andrew Jaynes, executive director of the Center for Law and Global Affairs at Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law (former general counsel for IIPI); and Jason Nickla, director of intellectual property at UNeMed/University of Nebraska Medical Center. They traveled to the Philippines in April and July on behalf of IIPI, spending a total of four weeks offering interactive workshops on IP management and technology transfer at universities throughout the country, including Manila, Cebu, Davao, and Legazpi.

“IIPI appreciates the outstanding contributions Dr. Kowalski has made to its IP and technology transfer capacity building work in the Philippines, on the USPTO-supported Innovation Opportunities Program,” said the Hon. Bruce A. Lehman, chairman of IIPI and a former commissioner of the USPTO. “The shared vision, mission and approach of IIPI and ITTI can create a synergy to catalyze sustainable, accelerated advancement of knowledge-based, innovation-driven economic development in the Philippines. This will require focused mobilization of human capital, strategic use of patent and scientific information platforms, expansion of global networks and strengthening of institutional infrastructure. IIPI and ITTI can collaborate with partners in the Philippines to make this happen.”

In the Philippines, Kowalski and the other members of his team were hosted by the Intellectual Property Office of the Philippines (IPOPHL). Director General Ricardo R. Blancaflor said his office appreciates Kowalski’s continued commitment to foster IP awareness, education, and management in universities throughout the Philippines.

“Over the past two years, his work in the Philippines has contributed towards building IP and technology transfer capacity, patent information access and international networks, so important for the development of a dynamic IP system in the Philippines,” Blancaflor said. “Professor Kowalski is a continuing inspiration to us here at IPOPHL, and we will always be grateful for what he has done for Philippine innovation.”

Kowalski also gave two lectures on accelerating innovation development in the Philippines. The first took place at the Ateneo Law School, at Ateneo de Manila University, where he spoke about “Accelerating innovation-based development in the Philippines: Open innovation, capacity building, assessments and informed strategic approaches.” Here, Kowalski was hosted by UNH Law alum Ferdinand M. Negre MIP ’93, currently with Bengzon Negre Untalan (BNU) Intellectual Property Attorneys.

Kowalski also spoke at the Institute of Molecular Biology and Biotechnology University of the Philippines Los Baños (UPLB). His talk, delivered to students, academics, government officials and professionals from both UPLB and the International Rice Research Institute (IRRI), centered on the classic case study of IP management and access to advanced innovations in agriculture: “Golden Rice: A case study in humanitarian innovation and global access.” Golden Rice (rice genetically engineered to accumulate pro-vitamin A) is currently under development at IRRI to alleviate chronic vitamin A deficiency in countries where it is a widespread public health threat.

Kowalski holds a doctorate in plant breeding from Cornell University, and his background as a research scientist has informed his work building innovation infrastructure in developing countries around the world. By combining theory with practice, ITTI advances its global mandate to accelerate knowledge-based, innovation-driven development in emerging economies. Kowalski, through ITTI, also has worked in Colombia, Argentina, Zimbabwe, South Africa, Singapore, Italy, and Switzerland. Kowalski was invited by IIPI to participate in the Philippines project because of his previous work in the country: Over the past two years, he has worked with WIPO’s TISC program in the Philippines, helping to train staff. This is a continuation of Kowalski’s ongoing collaboration with WIPO’s Andrew Czajkowski, who heads the organization’s Innovation and Technology Support Section.

“The combined expertise and effort of a dedicated group of IP professionals has forged a collaborative synergy that will accelerate innovation-driven, knowledge-based economic development in the Philippines,” said Kowalski. “Such international partnerships in development and capacity building are essential for sustainable progress and success. I am also particularly encouraged by the leadership role of women IP professionals in the Philippines. This will foster the formulation of IP public policy that addresses crucial issues for access to innovations in health and agriculture, that is, advancing IP management and technology transfer in the context of social justice and the public interest.”

Top photo, taken July 9 in Manila, Philippines: From left: Andrew Jaynes, Executive Director, Center for Law and Global Affairs at Sandra Day O’Connor College of Law (former general counsel for IIPI); UNH Law's Dr. Stanley Kowalski; Intellectual Property Office of the Philippines Director General Ricardo R. Blancaflor; Dr. Richard Cahoon, retired director of the Cornell University Research Foundation (technology transfer office), currently on the International Professional Development Committee of the Association of University Technology Managers; and Jason Nickla, director of Intellectual Property at UNeMed/University of Nebraska Medical Center.

A full gallery of photos is available on UNH Law's Facebook page.

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