University of New Hampshire

School of Law

UNH Law Awarded at Association of University Technology Managers Conference

University of New Hampshire School of Law Professor Stanley P. Kowalski and four students, Micah Ascano, Aleck Ncube, Kaitlyn Turo, and Wendy Zimbone, recently attended the annual meeting of the Association of University Technology Mangers (AUTM) in Las Vegas, Nevada.

UNH Law was well represented at the meeting: Students were awarded three of the 10 competitive annual AUTM Foundation Scholarships. Two students, Turo and Zimbone, each received a Howard Bremer Scholarship, which are awarded on a worldwide basis to five students who want to build expertise in academic technology transfer. Ncube, of Zimbabwe, who attended UNH Law as a visiting Fulbright Scholar in the fall of 2010, received a Developing Economies Scholarship, which is awarded on a worldwide basis to five students who want to build capacity in technology transfer in emerging economies.

The AUTM annual meeting, from Feb. 27 through March 2, afforded students the opportunity to attend numerous networking receptions, educational modules, and poster sessions. The AUTM Foundation, which funded the trip for the three scholarship winners, also presented them with engraved awards at a ceremony at the plenary session.

In attendance were Dr. Howard Bremer, one of the drafters of the Bayh-Dole Act, and Dr. Ashley J. Stevens, the President of AUTM. Dr. Stevens will travel to UNH Law on March 24 to participate in a career forum for students interested in technology transfer.

In addition, representing the International Technology Transfer Institute (ITTI) at UNH Law’s Franklin Pierce Center for Intellectual Property, Kowalski presented a poster entitled “Patent Data Mining and Landscapes: Promoting Global Health and Agricultural Innovation,” an ITTI Clinic project with Professor Jon R. Cavicchi, analyzing HIV vaccine platform technologies, dengue fever diagnostic technologies and agricultural biotechnology for insect-resistant crops in Africa.

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