University of New Hampshire

School of Law

School of Law

Students Win Competitive Technology Transfer Scholarships

Two University of New Hampshire School of Law students have received prestigious scholarships by the Association of University Technology Managers, an organization dedicated to supporting and advancing academic technology transfer globally.

Kaitlyn Turo and Wendy Zimbone were awarded Howard Bremer scholarships, which are given annually to selected students who want to build expertise in academic technology transfer. According to the association, the scholarships are awarded to those who dream of becoming revolutionaries in the academic technology transfer field.

Through the scholarship, Turo and Zimbone will travel to the association's annual meeting this month in Las Vegas and receive formal recognition and an honorarium. What's equally important, they say, will be the connections they make through the networking opportunities the scholarship provides.Wendy Zimbone JD11

"The scholarship will give me the support I need to keep my career going post law school," said Zimbone, a third-year student whose goal is to direct a university tech transfer office and teach tech transfer to law students.

For the past year, Zimbone has worked as a clerk at the University of New Hampshire's Technology Transfer Center. She plans to work there full-time after graduation.

"The hands-on experience made me fall in love with university technology transfer and inspired me to steer my legal career in that direction," she said. "Prior to law school, I had a diverse background in engineering, entrepreneurship, and marketing. I worked for a large government contractor as an engineer, owned my own company, and had several internships in public service. I was delighted to find a career where I could combine my skill set to benefit researchers, scientists, businesses, and the university."Kaitlyn Turo JD12

Turo, a second-year-student, earned her scholarship through her work this past summer at the Rutgers University Office of Technology Commercialization. She continues to work for Rutgers OTC and may return there for the summer.

"I had never worked at a technology transfer office before, but I knew that the work blended the legal, scientific, and business disciplines," Turo said. "I learned a lot about technology licensing, and I hope to carve out a career in it. I think there is a great opportunity for lawyers to enter this field, even though it’s not a traditional path for a lawyer. Interdisciplinary opportunities for lawyers are growing, and this is one of those areas."

A third scholarship winner has ties to the school: Aleck Ncube of Zimbabwe, who attended UNH Law as a visiting Fulbright scholar in the fall of 2010, received a scholarship for technology transfer professionals from developing economies from the Association of University Technology Managers.

Ncube, who intends to build his country’s first "proper technology transfer office," will also attend the conference in Las Vegas.